Ann Jönsson, Project Manager at the Nordic Centre for Welfare and Social Issues

In the borderland

Why is it important for partially sighted children to learn Braille?  

To be able to see a little bit, like I can, means that you are living in a kind of borderland. You are neither blind nor sighted. For many years it was very important for me to define myself as fully sighted. I did not walk with the white cane, and I did not use Braille, which I had learned as a child. When I finally understood that I needed both of my written languages I felt that I finally was coming home, like I was becoming a whole person. Blind and partially sighted children´s right to a written language is a vital issue for the Swedish Association of the Visually Impaired.

In this presentation Ann will tell you about her life experiences and the challenges you face when you have two written languages. You will get an insight in how it is to live in the borderland and the risk it includes to be without a written language. She will talk about the importance of inspiring partially sighted children to learn Braille and give her view on the technical development and future challenges.

Handout file (word, opens in new window)

 

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